Lake by the Atlantic Ocean

"When you’re twenty-two you’re not an expert on any-fucking-thing" - Billy Connolly

Posts tagged police

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humansofnewyork:

"I’m a traffic cop. It’s a job. Somebody’s got to do it. I don’t even represent myself when I’m working. If I was representing myself, I’d let everyone off with a warning. I represent a system. Did I design the system? No. I just enforce it. It’s not for me to decide the system. We elect the people who decide the system. When I write a ticket, everyone tells me a reason that they don’t deserve it. If I gave a warning to everyone with a reason, I wouldn’t give any tickets, and the system wouldn’t work. I don’t get any joy by giving a ticket. And I’m not upset if you beat it in court. It’s not personal. It’s my job."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m a traffic cop. It’s a job. Somebody’s got to do it. I don’t even represent myself when I’m working. If I was representing myself, I’d let everyone off with a warning. I represent a system. Did I design the system? No. I just enforce it. It’s not for me to decide the system. We elect the people who decide the system. When I write a ticket, everyone tells me a reason that they don’t deserve it. If I gave a warning to everyone with a reason, I wouldn’t give any tickets, and the system wouldn’t work. I don’t get any joy by giving a ticket. And I’m not upset if you beat it in court. It’s not personal. It’s my job."

Filed under humans of new york people photo police

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On another occasion, a guy showed up naked at the front door of a female acquaintance and shouted “I’m gonna fuck you in the ass!” He pinned her down on her bed, at which point she began kicking his balls. When he let go of her arms to try to pin her legs, she reached down and started punching his balls. Eventually she got all four limbs into the act, just wailing on his nuts until the signal reached his brain that it would be better to leave.

Finding him was fairly easy; he was the guy who had walked back to his hotel room wearing only a cowboy hat and briefs. After all he did, we still offered to let him put on pants before being hauled off to jail. His response? “Fuck pants.”

5 Things I Learned as a Cop (That Movies Won’t Show You)

Filed under cracked cop police list

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timelightbox:


2013: The Year in 365 Pictures
Pictured: Dec. 4, 2013. A general view of the welcoming ceremony of the promotion of new police officers at the Prefecture de police in Paris, France. (Pierre Andrieu—AFP/Getty Images) 
Visit LightBox for updates throughout the month as we complete our 365 gallery, featuring one photograph from each calendar day of the past year selected by TIME’s Senior Photo Editor Phil Bicker.

timelightbox:

2013: The Year in 365 Pictures

Pictured: Dec. 4, 2013. A general view of the welcoming ceremony of the promotion of new police officers at the Prefecture de police in Paris, France. (Pierre Andrieu—AFP/Getty Images)

Visit LightBox for updates throughout the month as we complete our 365 gallery, featuring one photograph from each calendar day of the past year selected by TIME’s Senior Photo Editor Phil Bicker.

Filed under photo Time paris pierre andrieu police france police officers ceremony

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In Los Angeles Plays Itself, Thom Andersen marvels that the television version of Dragnet depicted the Los Angeles Police Department both as it saw itself, and as it wanted to be perceived by the public: as a terrifying force for order, populated by glowering, cold-blooded, faintly sociopathic robo-officers who made little effort to hide their contempt both for criminals and for the citizens they were sworn to protect and serve. It’s tempting to write that Jack Webb and his partners in crime-fighting represented the friendly, smiling face of fascism, but if my childhood memories of watching Dragnet are accurate, only shaggy freaks hopped up on goofballs and purple poppers smiled, and friendliness was in short supply, from cops and criminals alike. Joe Friday wasn’t the smiling, friendly face of fascism: He was the glowering, joyless, ice-cold face of fascism. Yet audiences rooted for him all the same. As a child, I found something weirdly comforting about Dragnet’s lack of moral ambiguity. It inhabited a world devoid of grays: The good guys were good, the bad guys were bad, and people were more or less exactly what they appeared to be.
Before TV remakes became common, Dan Aykroyd revived Dragnet

Filed under dragnet los angeles police tv film cinema dan aykroyd joe friday jack webb lapd