Lake by the Atlantic Ocean

"When you’re twenty-two you’re not an expert on any-fucking-thing" - Billy Connolly

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all-about-bette:


My attention was drawn to the slashes of bright red lipstick, but even more stricking were her eyes. They were accentuated by blue eye shadow and layers of false lashes with brown, not black, mascara. It was the eyes that dominated.
I was to learn that Bette customarily took this kind of care with her appearance when meeting someone for the first time. She shared with Mae West the belief that the first impression was the one that counted most and always remained. The next time, one met more of a private person and less of a star, someone who had put in fewer hours of preparation. By the third meeting, she could be quite casual, without her false eyelashes, without the carefully coiffed wig, but never without her bright red lips.

Charlotte ChandlerThe Girl Who Walked Home Alone

all-about-bette:

My attention was drawn to the slashes of bright red lipstick, but even more stricking were her eyes. They were accentuated by blue eye shadow and layers of false lashes with brown, not black, mascara. It was the eyes that dominated.

I was to learn that Bette customarily took this kind of care with her appearance when meeting someone for the first time. She shared with Mae West the belief that the first impression was the one that counted most and always remained. The next time, one met more of a private person and less of a star, someone who had put in fewer hours of preparation. By the third meeting, she could be quite casual, without her false eyelashes, without the carefully coiffed wig, but never without her bright red lips.

Charlotte Chandler
The Girl Who Walked Home Alone

(via sharontates)

Filed under bette davis film photo the girl who walked home alone old hollywood

891 notes


When I reached a certain level of achievement in scriptwriting, Yama-san (Kajiro Yamamoto) told me to start editing. I already knew that you can’t be a film director if you can’t edit. Film editing involves putting on the finishing touches. More than this, it is a process of breathing life into the work…
I learned a mountain of things about editing from Yama-san, but I think the most vital among them is the fact that when you are editing you must have the intelligence to look at your own work objectively… no matter how much work the director, the assistant director, the cameraman or the lighting technicians put into a film, the audience never knows. What is necessary is to show them something that is complete and has no excess. When you are shooting, of course, you film only what you believe is necessary. But very often you realize only after having shot it that you didn’t need it after all. You don’t need what you don’t need. Yet human nature wants to place value on things in direct proportion to the amount of labor that went into making them. In film editing, this natural inclination is the most dangerous of all attitudes. The art of the cinema has been called an art of time, but time used to no purpose cannot be called anything but wasted time. Among all the teachings of Yama-san on film editing, this was the greatest lesson.
— Akira Kurosawa | Something Like an Autobiography

When I reached a certain level of achievement in scriptwriting, Yama-san (Kajiro Yamamoto) told me to start editing. I already knew that you can’t be a film director if you can’t edit. Film editing involves putting on the finishing touches. More than this, it is a process of breathing life into the work…

I learned a mountain of things about editing from Yama-san, but I think the most vital among them is the fact that when you are editing you must have the intelligence to look at your own work objectively… no matter how much work the director, the assistant director, the cameraman or the lighting technicians put into a film, the audience never knows. What is necessary is to show them something that is complete and has no excess. When you are shooting, of course, you film only what you believe is necessary. But very often you realize only after having shot it that you didn’t need it after all. You don’t need what you don’t need. Yet human nature wants to place value on things in direct proportion to the amount of labor that went into making them. In film editing, this natural inclination is the most dangerous of all attitudes. The art of the cinema has been called an art of time, but time used to no purpose cannot be called anything but wasted time. Among all the teachings of Yama-san on film editing, this was the greatest lesson.

Akira Kurosawa | Something Like an Autobiography

(Source: kurosawa-akira, via cinematicfantastic)

Filed under akira kurosawa film editing photo filmmaking