Lake by the Atlantic Ocean

"When you’re twenty-two you’re not an expert on any-fucking-thing" - Billy Connolly

98 notes

splitsider:

"Instead of just saying Okay, what’s the first thought that comes to my head — what’s the easiest stereotype I can make fun of? and then just going with that, thinking a little bit deeper and trying to understand the real motivations and attitudes and behaviors that make us human, and then looking at those things as the material you can focus the joke on — I think that’s where the best comedy comes from and that’s why people like Key and Peele are almost infallible. It’d be really tough to put together a legitimate case about them being lazy or insensitive comedians. They feel like humanists to me.”
- @midnight co-creator, writer, and executive producer Alex Blagg on Key and Peele's “Insult Comic” sketch

splitsider:

"Instead of just saying Okay, what’s the first thought that comes to my head — what’s the easiest stereotype I can make fun of? and then just going with that, thinking a little bit deeper and trying to understand the real motivations and attitudes and behaviors that make us human, and then looking at those things as the material you can focus the joke on — I think that’s where the best comedy comes from and that’s why people like Key and Peele are almost infallible. It’d be really tough to put together a legitimate case about them being lazy or insensitive comedians. They feel like humanists to me.”

@midnight co-creator, writer, and executive producer Alex Blagg on Key and Peele's “Insult Comic” sketch

Filed under comedy key and peele splitsider

1 note

The cop on me asked for my driver’s license, looked at it, looked at me, and said, “Tell me what happened.” I told the cop what happened, exactly as I described it above, including the personal details about why I’d been agitated and drunk, which under the circumstances probably weren’t germane.

When I finished he said, “Would you like to press charges?”

"What for?" I asked.

"Assault," he said.

"Why would I press assault charges against him?"

"Because he hit you first."

I said, “Oh, no, he didn’t hit me first. He poked me in the chest.”

"That’s assault," my cop said. "He hit you first."

"I don’t think he actually meant to touch me, though," I said, while a voice deep inside me said, Stupid white boy, he’s making it plain and you’re not getting it.

"It doesn’t matter if he meant to touch you, he hit you first," he said. He was talking to me warmly and patiently, as you might explain things to a child. Wisdom was being imparted.

"You were in fear of your life," he added.

By now the adrenaline fog seemed to be lifting. I was seeing things in a more clinical way. The violence I had inflicted on this man was disproportionate to the “assault,” and the tone of this exchange with the cop felt conspiratorial.

And then it dawned on me, Mr. Slow-on-the-Uptake, what was really happening: this officer was helping me Get My Story Straight.

Understanding, at long last.

Different rules apply | MZS | Roger Ebert

Filed under matt zoller seitz police racism white privilege

16 notes

thedissolve:

“But there was one Soviet film that could stand proudly next to America’s greatest testosterone-fests: 1986’s Одиночное Плавание, known in English variously as Solo VoyageSolo JourneyIndependent Steaming, or The Detached Mission, written by Yevgeni Mesyatsev and directed by Mikhail Tumanishvili. This film, billed abroad as “the Russian Rambo,” is a fascinating Soviet attempt to create the same kind of action-adventure the United States was churning out at an alarming rate in the 1980s. It also represented the last gasp of a certain type of Soviet cinema that was extinct within months of the film’s release. Seen today, the bloodthirsty, greedy Americans of The Detached Mission’s mirror-world give some sense of what characters like Rocky IV’s Ivan Drago might feel like to a Russian. And it’s hilarious.”

Matthew Dessem looks back at “The Russian Rambo,” to explore what the misbegotten film says about Soviets’ perceptions of Americans, and of themselves. [Read more…]

Filed under soviet union film the dissolve essay matthew dessem rambo the russian rambo

0 notes

In March of 1987, a group of Soviet and American filmmakers sat down in Los Angeles to watch 60 years’ worth of their countries’ worst cinematic caricatures of each other. It was the international filmmaking equivalent of finding someone else’s burn book: from 1924’s The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West In The Land Of The Bolsheviks through Rambo: First Blood Part II, they watched Soviets play Americans and Americans play Soviets who ranged from bumblers to murderous automatons. But the superpowers didn’t meet on entirely equal footing; contemporary press accounts make it clear that the Americans had more to be embarrassed about than the Soviets. Ronald Reagan’s hardline anti-Communism had trickled down to Hollywood, yielding anti-masterpieces like Red Dawn and Rambo, featuring the thinnest Soviet villains since 1952’s Invasion U.S.A.—a title that had just been reused for an equally terrible Chuck Norris vehicle. The Soviet Union was a little less openly bellicose, both politically and cinematically, and for the most part, its films weren’t as cartoonish about the United States. The attendees knew it—Patton director Franklin Schaffner remarked, “I think we out-stereotyped you. And it wasn’t easy.”
Comrade Rambo

Filed under the dissolve film soviet union essay the russian rambo rambo matthew dessem franklin j. schaffner